quasian

dashingyounglad:

dynamicafrica:

In Photos: Portraits by photographer Jalani Morgan.

It’s always strange and a bit surreal to me when I look at a photograph of strangers and somehow manage to feel as though the person behind the lens has so aptly managed to capture the essence of those pictured. Perhaps it’s a bit of romanticism on my part, but I can’t help but feel that way when looking at the work of photographer Jalani Morgan. What may on the surface seem to be a simple portrait becomes an intensifying three-way relationship between the subject, the photographer and viewer.  A two-dimensional image is brought to life and in a matter of seconds, upon gazing at Morgan’s portraits, I have no option but to feel a close connection to the unknown faces captured by his lens.

Jalani Morgan is a portrait, fine art and documentary photographer. 

Born in Toronto, Ontario, and raised in Scarborough. He was influenced by his parents’ teachings of the African Diasporas and politics and through that is interjected into his art. 

He produces work that investigates the representation from the African diaspora.

Currently he is studying at York University in Toronto obtaining his degree in Anthropology and African Studies.

cant deal with how beautiful they are.

whitepeoplesaidwhat

sunnyvictoria asked:

my mom's side of the family always talks shit about how my dad left because he was black, and it's my moms fault for getting pregnant by one of those people. do they not understand that i am half him? i'm half "those people"? do any of you guys have any advice for dealing with them??

whitepeoplesaidwhat answered:

Hm. I’d avoid seeing them as much as possible. If you have to see them and they say racist shit, and you have the strength, call them out. Once they get angry with you, you probably won’t be invited over much anymore anyway, and then you won’t have to deal with them.

-Holly

alexthefab
Because we are different and do not speak English, Americans seem to ignore us. Another day, my husband got on a bus and then he paid the fare. While he waited to receive his change, the driver threw it on the bus floor. He cried and could not stop crying. It is hard to live in this foreign land with our language problem.

Everyday challenges continue to prevail for AAPI seniors, who remain a largely invisible community in the U.S. (via sarahjhuynh)

HOW FUCKING DARE YOU DO THIS TO A GRANDPA OMFG I WANT TO BEAT THE LIVING SHIT OUT OF THAT DRIVER AND TEACH THEM SOME FUCKING RESPECT

(via wednypls)

I want that driver’s head on a plate. Holy crap, who DOES that?!

(via ursulavernon)

that kinda shit is why i’m always super polite to bus drivers… because they are likely to fucking snap at any moment and i’m afraid of them :|

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista
badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:


“We always speak of rights of man and the freedom of the individual, but we forget that besides his rights, man has his responsibilities as well. These responsibilities do not merely extend to the poor and the suffering in the human kingdom, but also to the animal kingdom, which is even more helpless and in need of kindness and compassion. Surely, every living creature has its own right to happiness, and although it is true that there is so much cruelty and sorrow in nature, still there are many compensations and no cruelty in nature can equal that which is perpetrated by man.” - Rukmini Devi Arundale

Rukmini Devi (1904-1986)

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

We always speak of rights of man and the freedom of the individual, but we forget that besides his rights, man has his responsibilities as well. These responsibilities do not merely extend to the poor and the suffering in the human kingdom, but also to the animal kingdom, which is even more helpless and in need of kindness and compassion. Surely, every living creature has its own right to happiness, and although it is true that there is so much cruelty and sorrow in nature, still there are many compensations and no cruelty in nature can equal that which is perpetrated by man.” - Rukmini Devi Arundale

Rukmini Devi (1904-1986)

howtobeterrell

Saying things like “we’ve gone from white hoods to business suits” is one way to seem to speak to contemporary racism’s less vocal, yet still insidious nature. But it does a disservice to the public understanding of racism, and in the process undercuts the mission of drawing attention to contemporary racism’s severity.

It wasn’t the KKK that wrote the slave codes. It wasn’t the armed vigilantes who conceived of convict leasing, postemancipation. It wasn’t hooded men who purposefully left black people out of New Deal legislation. Redlining wasn’t conceived at a Klan meeting in rural Georgia. It wasn’t “the real racists” who bulldozed black communities in order to build America’s highway system. The Grand Wizard didn’t run COINTELPRO in order to dismantle the Black Panthers. The men who raped black women hired to clean their homes and care for their children didn’t hide their faces.

The ones in the hoods did commit violent acts of racist terrorism that shouldn’t be overlooked, but they weren’t alone. Everyday citizens participated in and attended lynchings as if they were state fairs, bringing their children and leaving with souvenirs. These spectacles, if not outright endorsed, were silently sanctioned by elected officials and respected members of the community.

It’s easy to focus on the most vicious and dramatic forms of racist violence faced by past generations as the site of “real” racism. If we do, we can also point out the perpetrators of that violence and rightly condemn them for their actions. But we can’t lose sight of the fact that those individuals alone didn’t write America’s racial codes. It’s much harder to talk about how that violence was only reinforcing the system of political, economic and cultural racism that made America possible. That history indicts far more people, both past and present.