sexgenderbody

A direct, honest and respectful conversation about sex, gender & body.

SGB policy on trigger warnings, tags and labels

why is there porn on SGB?

please contact us about accessibility

Email SGB: admin@sexgenderbody.com

Visit our community, collaborative blog: SexGenderBody.com

Recent Tweets @sexgenderbody
Who I Follow
Posts tagged "Feminism"

feministfirebender:

I’m so angry today about the “Asian” blanket term. How can the world throw us together just because it makes classification easier? Don’t talk to me about how much abuse and oppression “Asians” have gone through because East Asia and Southeast Asia is NOT the same thing. We are very different people with different sets of problems. You cannot act like we are one and the same.
And fuck the implication that Asians are just East Asians. Everytime we talk about being Asians, it starts with “I’m Asian too”. I shouldn’t need to remind you or inform you. I’m fucking Asian too.

I hate seeing these posts on Tumblr about American shows and “Asian” actors in them. Oh wow look 8 East Asian actors, and 2 South East Asians ones. Yay diversity. Don’t bunch us together. You undermine us by doing so. 

not-your-asian-fantasy:

The face of the US scientist is changing: Asian Americans now make up 14 percent of the science and engineering work force, according to recent data from the National Science Foundation (NSF), which can be found atwww.nsf.gov/statistics/seind08. With these numbers one would expect a proportionate increase in leadership positions. However, this is not the case.

In academia and federal institutes, Asian Americans encounter what some call a “bamboo ceiling,” similar to what female scientists faced 30 years ago. A diverse group, Asian Americans comprise numerous ethnicities, including Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, Indian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islanders. All lumped under the umbrella of the “model minority,” this community faces a number of misperceptions or stereotypes—some of which work in their favor and some of which do not. (NB: not sure about this “bamboo ceiling” catch phrase but there are some legit worrying stats in there.)

thechrysalid:

I’ve read a lot about the fetishisation of race - Asian in the articles I’ve read - and how this continues the White Western Male Patriarchal Dominance (WWMPD). Although as a non-Asian I have never been the object [sic] “Yellow Fever” as it is so disturbingly nicknamed, I can empathise that this racial profiling and sexualisation is demeaning and harmful to Asians and Asian woman.The filmmaker Debbie Lum made a documentary Seeking Asian Female, which follows the complicated relationship of 60-year-old Asiaphile Steven and his 30-year-old Chinese mail-order bride, Sandy.
As something Lum herself had experienced, she told ABC News she wanted to explore the psychology behind “Yellow Fever”. It seems that “Yellow Fever” is a bunch of assumptions that Asian women are submissive and easier to please, that they “know how to treat a man” as one suitor said. Apparently Asian women no longer know how to be women, or how to let men be men.
Not only does this ignore the lack of equality that women (White and Asian) have to men, but that Asian women are autonomous, strong, sassy women, they can be Feminists, and are just as strong as any other PERSON.

thechrysalid:

I’ve read a lot about the fetishisation of race - Asian in the articles I’ve read - and how this continues the White Western Male Patriarchal Dominance (WWMPD). Although as a non-Asian I have never been the object [sic] “Yellow Fever” as it is so disturbingly nicknamed, I can empathise that this racial profiling and sexualisation is demeaning and harmful to Asians and Asian woman.

The filmmaker Debbie Lum made a documentary Seeking Asian Female, which follows the complicated relationship of 60-year-old Asiaphile Steven and his 30-year-old Chinese mail-order bride, Sandy.

As something Lum herself had experienced, she told ABC News she wanted to explore the psychology behind “Yellow Fever”. It seems that “Yellow Fever” is a bunch of assumptions that Asian women are submissive and easier to please, that they “know how to treat a man” as one suitor said. Apparently Asian women no longer know how to be women, or how to let men be men.

Not only does this ignore the lack of equality that women (White and Asian) have to men, but that Asian women are autonomous, strong, sassy women, they can be Feminists, and are just as strong as any other PERSON.

dynamicafrica:

#TBT Dynamic Africa History Post: Who Was Huda Sha’arawi?

Considered to be one of the central figures in early 20th century feminism in Egypt, Huda Sha’arawi (pictured: center) was born into a wealthy family in Minya, Egypt, in 1879. She was the daughter of Muhammad Sultan, the first president of the Egyptian Representative Council.

Throughout her childhood and early adulthood, Sha’awari was raised in a harem, largely secluded from the outside world. At the thirteen, she was married to her cousin Ali Pasha Sha`arawi who she eventually separated from for seven years after he refused to leave his concubine, as per their marriage arrangement. During her separation from him, Sha’awari extended her formal education. From a young age, she was tutored in a variety of subjects and spoke French, Turkish, and Arabic. 

A pioneer and activist, Sha’awari was involved in many philanthropic projects throughout her life beginning with the establishing of the first philanthropic society run by Egyptian women, in 1908, that offered services for poor women and children. She argued that women-run social service projects were important for two reasons. First, by engaging in such projects, women would widen their horizons, acquire practical knowledge and direct their focus outward. Second, informed largely by her harem upbringing, such projects would challenge the view that women existed solely for men’s pleasure and were constantly in need of protection and guardianship by men. However, despite holding this progressive view of women’s rights at the time, Shaarawi saw the problems of the poor as issues to be resolved through charitable activities of the rich, particularly through donations to education programs. Holding a somewhat romanticized view of poor women’s lives, she viewed them as passive recipients of social services, not to be consulted about priorities or goals. The rich, in turn, were the “guardians and protectors of the nation.”

As a young woman, Sha’awari displayed defiant acts of independence. Once such incident involved her entering a department store in Alexandria to buy her own clothes instead of having them brought to her abode in her harem. In 1909, she also helped to organize Mubarrat Muhammad Ali, a women’s social service organization and the Union of Educated Egyptian Women in 1914, the year in which she traveled to Europe for the first time. Sha’awari helped lead the first women’s street demonstration during the Egyptian Revolution of 1919, and was elected president of the Wafdist Women’s Central Committee.

In 1910, she opened a school for girls focused on academics, rather than teaching practical skills like midwifery which was common at the time. Four years later, she founded the Intellectual Association of Egyptian Women. But it was her founding of the Egyptian Feminist Union (EFU) in 1923 that Sha’awari is often most remembered for. The EFU consisted of upper and middle class Egyptian women, and at its height had about 250 members. The EFU focused on various issues, particularly women’s suffrage, increased education for women, and changes in the Personal Status laws. While the EFU accomplished few of its goals, it is widely credited with setting the stage for later feminist victories. She remained an active member of the EFU throughout her life and the organization remains active to this day.
Part of Shaarawi’s motivation for founding the EFU was her desire to send a delegation of Egyptian women to the 9th Congress of the International Women’s Suffrage Alliance in Rome, in May 1923. In a speech at this conference, Shaarawi advanced her conception of Egyptian feminism. She argued, first, that women in ancient Egypt had equal status to men, and only under foreign domination had women lost those rights. Second, she argued that Islam also granted women equal rights to men, but that the Koran had been misinterpreted by those in power. Shaarawi and the EFU maintained their ties with the International Women’s Suffrage Alliance for several years. However, in the 1930s, increasingly influenced by the nationalist movement in Palestine, Shaarawi and her colleagues began to define nationalism in pan-Arab, rather than Egyptian, terms. In addition, they became increasingly suspicious of Western feminists, and began to cast their feminist struggle in pan-Arab terms as well. Eventually, they broke their ties to the Suffrage Alliance. In 1945, Shaarawi and the EFU played a major role in founding the All Arab Feminist Union.
Upon her return from the Rome conference in 1923, and following the death of her husband that same year, Sha’arawi performed an act that will forever be remembered as a major moment in her life: she removed her veil in public at a Cairo train station. Her decision to unveil was part of a greater movement of women and was influenced by French born Egyptian feminist, Eugénie Le Brun, but it contrasted with some feminist thinkers like Malak Hifni Nasif. In fact, some say that Sha’arawi’s removal her veil, although bold at the time, has become an exaggerated part of her life as removal of the veil was never on the EFU’s list of priorities.
Sha’arawi passed away in 1947. Much of her life was penned in her memoir The Harem Years.
(sources: 1 | 2 | 3)

crispyravioli:

I’m really not sure where to begin with this because I’ve only shared snippets of this experience with my sister and literally no one else. It’s been really hard to formulate my thoughts and feelings into something coherent because many of my experiences can (and will) be rebutted with gaslighting and strawman arguments and “why didn’t you assert yr agency”, and I become upset enough about this person as is. And, to boot, this person has no idea how fucked up I feel; I’ve never felt safe or justified in talking about this. But I am now.

My partner and I have been together for almost 7 years. We are high school sweethearts. We have been non-monogamous for around 2 years. We’re pretty boring in that despite not being monogamous, we would still rather be around each other the vast majority of the time. We’re best friends. He is truly one of my favourite people I’ve ever had the privilege of knowing. So, navigating seeing other people after many years of monogamy was difficult and rife with a lot of “uh, is this normal/acceptable?”. Let me expand.

Back track to my earlier days of non-monogamy, I was much more liberal feminist friendly, and for all intensive purposes identified as pansexual. I’ve never really had preferences for gender, if I’m attracted to you then I’m attracted to you, plain and simple.

I dated a person, let’s call him Jon, for a little while. In hindsight, so many scary red flags were there, but female conditioning means not believing oneself and one’s intuition.

On our first date, I was met with “I don’t believe in a ‘rape culture’”. I asked him to expand what he meant by this, and was further met with some sort of diatribe about how “if two people are drunk and they have sex with each other, i don’t believe should they both be charged with assault” sort of crap. It demonstrated a complete lack of understanding about what rape culture actually is, and I did my best to explain the culture that facilitates normalized sexual violence against women. He showed some sort of pitiful understanding and insinuated he would look into it more. I was confused because his OKC clearly identified him as feminist and anti-oppressive, yet he took issue with the concept of rape culture. I told myself to forget it and that I was placing too much emphasis on that point.

Fast forward a few hang outs: I’m not 100% sure where I see this person in terms of his relationship with me, and I haven’t had sex with him yet because of this. Jon clearly believes sex is 100% on the table, because in the least organic fashion possible, he goes “so, let’s talk about sex!” and I was put into the position of listing my sexual preferences, despite not having actually been intimate with him and knowing what I would like from him, because, ya know, just because you like one person doing something to you doesn’t mean it’s what you want everyone to do to you? After uncomfortably talking about myself while Jon got excited about all the things he assumed he could do to me, he brought up anal play (yep… haven’t even kissed yet), and I don’t even remember how I reacted, I’m confident I just mumbled something to get him to stop making me feel like I was put on the spot. Red flag.

I asked what he wanted to do activity-wise, and he responded with silence and pouting. I guess I took that as my cue to get in bed with him. My own bed. Placating this man in my own bed, my supposed safe space. Because what other reason would I have him here for, I guess. Even though in hindsight, I never expressed wanting him in my bedroom. I had been reduced to talking about myself in a vulnerable way, about information Jon thought he was privy to because he believed we were going to have sex. And I did not have the confidence to tell him otherwise. So I did what I thought I should do.

That was the first time I had sex with Jon, and it was rubbish sex to boot. Like literal garbage. I cringe as I type this, btw. I cringe so I don’t cry.

Jon started becoming more and more open with me about his gender identity issues and other… issues. And like the good liberal feminist I was, I took all this at face value and did not question it cause I assumed that made me a terrible person and/or transphobic.

Jon came over one day, declaring he was “not a man”. Again, the good liberal feminist in me immediately asked what his preferred pronouns were, and despite not being a man he still wanted to be addressed with “he, his, him”, male pronouns. He identified as “intersex” and when I asked about intersexuality being a biological condition his response was something along the lines of “well it has multiple meanings” and I did no further questioning. Jon was cis passing, no one would have ever assumed any differing gender identity from how he presented himself. The only difference between him and other men was that, in his head, he didn’t “feel” like a man, and therefore “wasn’t a man”. So he reaped the benefits of male privilege, but in his mind, this was all negated because of his feelings. He expanded on this by saying he was not comfortable in big groups of men and didn’t “relate” to them. Red flag.

Picture: me, the good liberal feminist, dressing the emotional wounds of a man who would continue to make me question myself and my thoughts for the next while.

I remember another conversation with him where he was expressing frustration with how some feminists in an academic setting spoke to him once during class or a meeting or something else I couldn’t have cared less about. He didn’t like their demeanor. I asked him why he thinks feminists should only respond in utter kindness to him (in my mind, what privileged shit did he spew in order to receive that feminist vitriol?), and he stated it was about “basic human respect”. Oh, that makes sense! Respect. Like the lack of which you demonstrate to women who take issue with your male analysis of their problems. I know this now but I didn’t trust my feminist logic enough to know it then. This was a male-presenting person who took issue with women who did NOT care about what he had to say. Red flag. 

Another time later, post-sex at his house, I was relaxing in his bed. I continued having sex with Jon because I was not trusting any of the things my discomfort and intuition was telling me; I thought my discomfort was inherently transphobic/cissexist and me not having sex with him was “not nice” and made me a bad person, bad feminist, a bad pansexual. I would listen to this man go on about how much living with his parents as a young “sexual” (read: horny) man sucked, was uncomfortable, whatever. I don’t even remember how I sympathized with it, I don’t know why I did. [Aside, random microaggressions: he continued to go down on me when I asked him to stop, “Why don’t you just relax” was what I heard, and I complied. Another time, he made me touch his penis, likely literally put my hand on his penis, without asking. Just did it. I complied.] 

And there, while lying in his bed, was I then subjected to him going on about his porn addiction. Yep. Jon had a porn addiction and I had to listen to him talk about it, because that’s what nice, good, supportive, understanding women do. We placate the men who are “addicted” to watching us being raped and abused and dehumanized. There I am, a naked woman having just had (bad) sex with him, and I get to listen to this garbage. Worse, I have no choice but to “explore” it with him and listen to him talk about how his compulsions show themselves, how his addiction manifests itself. Btw, he watched solely straight porn. He “wasn’t a man” but his sexual preferences and entitlement reeked of male conditioning. In no way would he view women as victims, or me as a victim, in his porn addiction woes. Red flag.

How did I react to this? Why, I felt so lucky that he was comfortable enough with me to talk about his gender issues, his addiction issues, his family issues. I am burdened, constantly, with the thankless female task of being a counselor for those who did not so much as ask me how I feel about porn. It was just assumed I’m ~cool~ with it because good liberal feminists are ~cool~ with whatever!

So I coped by thinking I was just a really good person for him to feel this comfortable around me. 

He would give me weekly updates about whether he had managed to avoid watching porn or not (apparently it’s really difficult to simply not search for it) and I noticed that times when he had sex with ACTUAL women, his addiction seemed to be at bay. He seemed to just need the porn when there weren’t actual real live women around.

What role did I play in this? Was my body, my vagina, and access to it, simply a part of his compulsion to dominate? Well.

Some time later, we were walking outside, when he told me he was thinking of opening up a FetLife account. I know, it’s like clockwork. I asked him why, and he told me he was looking for a sub (a female one of course). I didn’t ask him to expand on it, because frankly I didn’t care. I had a strong feeling he was trying to gauge whether I would placate his need to have a woman to sexually dominate. I knew, at least, that this was NOT a role I wanted in his life. And, again, did not place much emphasis on it at the time, because libfems assert that BDSM is empowering and a-ok provided ~consent~ is there, so what could possibly be wrong with his “need” to do and engage in stuff like this.

Jon and I don’t hang out anymore. It’s been over a year. 

My encounter with dating a genderspecial person resulted in me ignoring my intuition, my gut, my discomfort, so that I could be the good compliant non argumentative woman and partner. I have been minimalizing my own fucking awful experiences for ages now, with no one to talk to about this, because I am afraid of being dismissed, afraid of him being considered an “exception in the trans community”. Worse, I told myself a lot that it’s not that bad, others have had way worse sexual encounters so who am I to complain.

Jon did not understand that not matter how much he asserted he was not a man, his life went on as though he was. People treated him like he was. My fearful responses to so many things he said and did were a response to being afraid of men, which I did not recognize at the time, as many woman are raised to not recognize power dynamics and men are raised to ignore them. He benefited from being a man.

And he has no. fucking. idea. I sit here typing this out, trying to make sense of this, and he’s a-ok. Jon is fine.

And I don’t think I was much else for this trans/intersex/however-he-identified person other than a hole. He could blither on about feminist rhetoric all he wanted to and then in the same breath ask for sympathy for his porn addiction I really didn’t want to hear about.

And I remember thinking that I was a bad person. Women are always to blame. I blamed myself. Where was my voice?

It was muffled by female fear of men, in ordinance with female subjugation. And it must still be, because pressing the “post” button on this page has me scared.

powerful stuff. thanks for sharing it.

micdotcom:

23 women show us their favorite positions

When reality television star and fashion blogger Lauren Conrad was asked what her “favorite position” was on a live radio program a while back, the women listening held their breath. Although we take great pride in the work that we do, most of us could relate to being undermined and belittled publicly at work. When Conrad cleverly retorted “CEO,” it was hard not to aggressively high-five our laptop and mobile devices. The words “hell” and “yeah” could be heard all across the nation.

1 in 3 women has experienced some form of sex discrimination at work | Follow micdotcom 

(via dr-archeville)

If kept within the bounds of activism, action will lead only to a certain version of freedom—one that has dominated Arab feminism for the last sixty years and that has still not changed the material conditions that perpetuate oppression at the somatic and social levels. If, however, action is understood as a reorientation of affects on the basis of a careful understanding of the conditions that structure not only our social, political, and economic position in the world but our feelings as well, then other unconsidered forms of freedom can be affirmed.
Found a paper titled “Disjunctive Synthesis: Deleuze and Arab Feminism”
Historical visions of Arab women have been dominated by the Western-generated frenzy over the odalisque, the favorite subject of many European artists, such as Matisse, Ingres, and Delacroix. In Arabic, oda means room; thus, the woman of the room, or a concubine of the sultan confined to an enclosed space. The odalisque was forbidden to be seen by any other man save the sultan, whose exclusive plaything she was. In Matisse’s Odalisque with Left Knee Bent, the woman sits in one of the rooms of the harem, lounging idly, forming part of the colorful background but not performing any action. The atmosphere created is one of sensual idleness, a woman keeping herself distracted, perhaps while waiting for the sultan to visit. An epitome of available sexuality, she is a figure who appears in many forms and guises in European artwork and literature (for examples of the latter, one need go no further than George Gordon, Lord Byron, who fancied himself an eastern hero of adventures, slipping into harems and battling despotic sultans and sheiks). Her image still pervades Western conceptions of the East as lazy, sensual, exotic, and willing to succumb—the same image that Arab women writers like Ahdaf Soueif and Leila Sebbar seek to reconstruct.

dynamicafrica:

#TBT Dynamic Africa History Post: Who Was Huda Sha’arawi?

Considered to be one of the central figures in early 20th century feminism in Egypt, Huda Sha’arawi (pictured: center) was born into a wealthy family in Minya, Egypt, in 1879. She was the daughter of Muhammad Sultan, the first president of the Egyptian Representative Council.

Throughout her childhood and early adulthood, Sha’awari was raised in a harem, largely secluded from the outside world. At the thirteen, she was married to her cousin Ali Pasha Sha`arawi who she eventually separated from for seven years after he refused to leave his concubine, as per their marriage arrangement. During her separation from him, Sha’awari extended her formal education. From a young age, she was tutored in a variety of subjects and spoke French, Turkish, and Arabic. 

A pioneer and activist, Sha’awari was involved in many philanthropic projects throughout her life beginning with the establishing of the first philanthropic society run by Egyptian women, in 1908, that offered services for poor women and children. She argued that women-run social service projects were important for two reasons. First, by engaging in such projects, women would widen their horizons, acquire practical knowledge and direct their focus outward. Second, informed largely by her harem upbringing, such projects would challenge the view that women existed solely for men’s pleasure and were constantly in need of protection and guardianship by men. However, despite holding this progressive view of women’s rights at the time, Shaarawi saw the problems of the poor as issues to be resolved through charitable activities of the rich, particularly through donations to education programs. Holding a somewhat romanticized view of poor women’s lives, she viewed them as passive recipients of social services, not to be consulted about priorities or goals. The rich, in turn, were the “guardians and protectors of the nation.”

As a young woman, Sha’awari displayed defiant acts of independence. Once such incident involved her entering a department store in Alexandria to buy her own clothes instead of having them brought to her abode in her harem. In 1909, she also helped to organize Mubarrat Muhammad Ali, a women’s social service organization and the Union of Educated Egyptian Women in 1914, the year in which she traveled to Europe for the first time. Sha’awari helped lead the first women’s street demonstration during the Egyptian Revolution of 1919, and was elected president of the Wafdist Women’s Central Committee.

In 1910, she opened a school for girls focused on academics, rather than teaching practical skills like midwifery which was common at the time. Four years later, she founded the Intellectual Association of Egyptian Women. But it was her founding of the Egyptian Feminist Union (EFU) in 1923 that Sha’awari is often most remembered for. The EFU consisted of upper and middle class Egyptian women, and at its height had about 250 members. The EFU focused on various issues, particularly women’s suffrage, increased education for women, and changes in the Personal Status laws. While the EFU accomplished few of its goals, it is widely credited with setting the stage for later feminist victories. She remained an active member of the EFU throughout her life and the organization remains active to this day.
Part of Shaarawi’s motivation for founding the EFU was her desire to send a delegation of Egyptian women to the 9th Congress of the International Women’s Suffrage Alliance in Rome, in May 1923. In a speech at this conference, Shaarawi advanced her conception of Egyptian feminism. She argued, first, that women in ancient Egypt had equal status to men, and only under foreign domination had women lost those rights. Second, she argued that Islam also granted women equal rights to men, but that the Koran had been misinterpreted by those in power. Shaarawi and the EFU maintained their ties with the International Women’s Suffrage Alliance for several years. However, in the 1930s, increasingly influenced by the nationalist movement in Palestine, Shaarawi and her colleagues began to define nationalism in pan-Arab, rather than Egyptian, terms. In addition, they became increasingly suspicious of Western feminists, and began to cast their feminist struggle in pan-Arab terms as well. Eventually, they broke their ties to the Suffrage Alliance. In 1945, Shaarawi and the EFU played a major role in founding the All Arab Feminist Union.
Upon her return from the Rome conference in 1923, and following the death of her husband that same year, Sha’arawi performed an act that will forever be remembered as a major moment in her life: she removed her veil in public at a Cairo train station. Her decision to unveil was part of a greater movement of women and was influenced by French born Egyptian feminist, Eugénie Le Brun, but it contrasted with some feminist thinkers like Malak Hifni Nasif. In fact, some say that Sha’arawi’s removal her veil, although bold at the time, has become an exaggerated part of her life as removal of the veil was never on the EFU’s list of priorities.
Sha’arawi passed away in 1947. Much of her life was penned in her memoir The Harem Years.
(sources: 1 | 2 | 3)

unknownshadeof:

rosalarian:

Gonna keep a tally of messages I get from a) white feminists completely proving my point and b) people who think this comic proves feminism is worthless because I criticized one part of it. (Even despite me writing these words underneath the comic.) Then I’ll add them all up, see which column has more, and then drink myself to sleep either way.

Haha… this is why we can’t have nice things.

This comic is perfect.

(via devotedtodiversityinart)

zeezeescorner:

Obstetric fistula is a condition that occurs during a prolonged childbirth where a woman lacks adequate healthcare. It results in tearing of the birth canal which leads to incontinence and results in 90% of babies being stillborn. As a result, women are left unable to control their bodies, leading to bad body odour. These women are often abandoned by their husbands and exiled from their communities for being “unclean.” It affects 2 million women in 55 countries. The condition is mostly preventable when women have access to healthcare and education. In most cases, surgery can repair damage.

UN-Secretary General Ban Ki-moon says: 

Women with obstetric fistula sometimes die in shame abandoned by their families and often suffer lifelong physical and emotional effects — but there is hope. Skilled professionals know how to treat patients. With support, those who have been ostracized can reintegrate into their societies.”

Watch this video narrated by ambassador Natalie Imbruglia to learn more about the condition & how to help.

she-hulk-smash:

Yuri Kochiyama is my activist role model because she specifically cared about and showed up for black, Latino, and Native American communities. Asian oppression was not her main focus with other oppression coming in second; her primary goal was dismantling white supremacy and she understood that fighting for ALL people of color was crucial in achieving that goal.

I am a pinay feminist but I cannot have my feminism be exclusively Asian. I have to be here for all of us and part of that is the acknowledgment of anti-blackness and shadeism in my community that needs to be eradicated. Antiblackness is a crucial component, if not the true heart of white supremacy, and if we don’t make the dismantling of that a priority in our feminism, we are operating on exclusivity and success at the expense of black people. We need to stop appropriating, stop aligning ourselves superficially, and for fuck’s sake, WE NEED TO STOP USING THE N WORD BECAUSE IT IS NOT OURS. We cannot claim to be activists if we willingly remain ignorant.

Discussion of oppression should not just cover intersectionality of individual identity, it should be about solidarity across communities.

haganenorekinjutsushi:

including the following: East Asian, Southeast Asian, South Asian, and West Asian/Middle East, the indigenous people of North Asia/Russia, and mixed race Asians
Like/reblog this post if you are a fellow feminist of Asian descent, no matter where you currently reside, so that I can follow you ^^
(I’m Korean, living in America.)

lucyandlouise:

Huda Shaarawi

  • Huda Shaarawi was born in Cairo, Egypt in 1879 to an affluent family
  • She was raised in the harem system, which kept women veiled and secluded from society
  • At thirteen, she was forced to marry her older cousin as his second wife
  • Huda refused to marry him at first ,but her family pressured her into the marriage
  • Soon Huda separated from husband and they stayed separated for several years
  • While separated from her husband, Huda was able to receive more education and became involved in activism
  • She was not happy with the harem system so she began to organize lectures for women, which brought women into the public for the first time in some cases
  • In 1908, she created an organization operated by Egyptian women that offered different services for poor women and children
  • In 1910, Huda opened a school for girls that focused on education rather than skills like midwifery
  • In 1919, she organized one of the largest Egyptian women’s anti-British demonstration
  • In 1922, Huda decided to stop wearing her veil after the death of her husband
  • In 1923, when she came back from a women’s conference in Europe, she reportedly stepped off the train and removed her veil
  • That same year Huda created the Egyptian Feminist Union, which is still active today
  • The organization focused on different women’s issues such as education, restrictions involving women’s clothing, and the organization lobbied to raise the minimum age of marriage for girls to sixteen
  • In 1927, Egypt opened its first secondary school for girls as a result of the Egyptian Feminist Union
  • In 1944, Huda founded the All Arab Federation of Women
  • She continued to be active in her organizations until she died in 1947 at the age of 68
  • Source: amazing women in history, wise muslim women, distinguished women