benot-may

Querido Chile:

benot-may:

(En Chile se esta reabriendo el debate acerca de la legalización del aborto terapéutico  debido al caso de una jovencita de 11 años que esta embarazada de su padrastro, quién la violó. Yo soy una joven de 20 años, y estas son mis razones por las cuales soy pro-aborto. )


Quiero poder tener la opción de abortar, y que sea mi elección. 

Quiero que así como tengo autoridad sobre mi cuerpo al decidir no donar órganos después de morir, pueda elegir mi vida por sobre la vida de un embrión de menos de 12 semanas. 
Quiero que no se me criminalice por una decisión dificilísima, y que varía de mujer a mujer, y de caso a caso.
Quiero que lo discutan personas dispuestas a dialogar y a llegar a un acuerdo, y que la opinión de una persona con útero se valore por sobre el de aquellos que no lo tienen.

Si, quiero que se legalice el aborto terapeútico.

Yo no soy un recipiente que trae un contenido al mundo, y mi propósito en este mundo no es únicamente propagar la raza, yo soy tan importante como el embrión que se está gestando, y si no voy a ser capaz de darle una vida tranquila a mi hijo, ya sea por situación económica, por que nacerá para morir, o que tendrá que vivir sin su madre por que murió dándolo a luz, yo seré la que tome la decisión.


Este es un espacio de actualidad periodística abierto a reconocer la diversidad y riqueza del movimiento de mujeres y de las feministas chilenas. Es también un guiño hacia la historia que nos ayuda a construir el presente. Una ventana para las que recién vienen descubriendo el poder de la organización y la complicidad entre mujeres. Feministas Tramando es periodismo comprometido que no esconde el lugar desde donde mira, como sí lo hacen los medios tradicionales con su pretendida objetividad. Comprometidas y rigurosas, las Feministas Tramando apostamos por la comunicación para transformar el mundo y no al servicio de su reproducción. Aquí creemos en la fuerza política de la comunicación.
Contactos: feministastramando@gmail.com

Este es un espacio de actualidad periodística abierto a reconocer la diversidad y riqueza del movimiento de mujeres y de las feministas chilenas. Es también un guiño hacia la historia que nos ayuda a construir el presente. Una ventana para las que recién vienen descubriendo el poder de la organización y la complicidad entre mujeres. Feministas Tramando es periodismo comprometido que no esconde el lugar desde donde mira, como sí lo hacen los medios tradicionales con su pretendida objetividad. Comprometidas y rigurosas, las Feministas Tramando apostamos por la comunicación para transformar el mundo y no al servicio de su reproducción. Aquí creemos en la fuerza política de la comunicación.

Contactos: feministastramando@gmail.com

fylatinamericanhistory

Today In Latin American History

fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

September 11

  • 1541: The Picunche indigenous leader Michimalonco leads an ultimately unsuccessful attack against the newly founded Spanish colonial settlement of Santiago de la Nueva Extremadura in present-day Chile. The settlement’s leader, Inés de Suárez, retaliates by beheading seven indigenous chiefs who had been imprisioned by the Spanish.
  • 1829: In Mexico, Antonio López de Santa Anna earns the title El Héroe de Tampico after defeating an invading Spanish army led by Isidro Barradas.
  • 1973: A violent military coup d’état headed by Gen. Augusto Pinochet and backed by the United States puts an end to the government of president Salvador Allende, who commits suicide inside the presidential palace of La Moneda while under attack by the military.
  • 2009: Juan Almeida Bosque, a major figure of Cuban Revolution who went on to have a long career in the Cuban government, dies at age 82 in Havana.
fuckyeahmarxismleninism

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Santiago de Chile, November 29 (Prensa Latina) - Chilean public workers will begin a 48-hour strike on Tuesday to demand job security and reject the wage adjustment presented by the government.

The protesters are members of the National Association of Fiscal Employees (ANEF), the Teachers Association and the National Federation of University Professionals in the Health Services, three of the main public sector unions.

According to ANEF leader Raul de la Puente, the wage proposal of a five percent increase is still insufficient. This was announced by the government in recent hours and accepted by 11 of the 14 public associations such as the National Confederation of Municipal Health Workers.

The ANEF had requested a salary increase of 9.8 percent, while the government had proposed a four percent increase which then rose to 4.5 and finally to five percent.

Besides an increased adjustment and automatic renewal of employment contracts designed to ensure job security, the strikers also demand an adequate retirement incentive policy.

otterowl
They said Pinochet would make Chile a free country. Well, they tortured me for free. They didn’t make me pay anything for that.

After our adventures in the occupied highschool, we went to a nearby cafe, drank amazing coffee with rum in it, and made a new friend, the proprietor of the cafe, a man called Eddy. The quote above comes from him.

Eddy sat down with us and talked to us about all kinds of things - being an activist before and during the Allende government, the horrors of the Pinochet coup and its aftermath, including being tortured by them for being a dissident, and the continuous negative effects of Pinochet’s economic and social policies on Chile today.

He talked about the horrible inequality that exists in Chile today - corporations and mining companies are incredibly wealthy, but the labour movement was pretty much destroyed under Pinochet and hasn’t really recovered. The GDP of the country is pretty high, but the overall standard of living is much lower than in Argentina, for example. There’s pretty high levels of poverty, particularly for the Indigenous populations, for whom land rights and access to education are very important issues. The government has a pretty high federal reserve, but instead of spending it on infrastructure, education and other important things in Chile, it’s being loaned to European countries to prop up their struggling economies.

When I was small, my mother was involved with a group of Chilean refugees who were anti-Pinochet, and I remember learning about the disappearances at a very early age. Because of this, I expected that there would be a much more anti-Pinochet presence in Chile, but it’s been pretty minimal. The wealthy part of the population seem to still be very in favour of him, and all the 11/9/73 memorial stuff was in the form of subversive protests, which I wasn’t really expecting. Eddy told us that a lot of people don’t care about the crimes against humanity that the Pinochet regime perpetrated, because some people managed to become very wealthy.

Eddy talked to us about the recent student protests, as well, which he was very in favour of. He told us that last month, there was a protest in the Plaza Brasil and the carabineros let off a lot of teargas bombs, which made everyone in the neighbourhood sick afterwards. He told us that the parents of students who are occupying the universities are sometimes losing their jobs because of what their kids are doing.

This made me incredibly thankful to live in a country with a strong labour movement. Having the right to organise, to not lose your job because of the political affiliation or actions of your family members, to be able to fight for decent conditions that mean class is not entrenched - these are valuable rights that I think a lot of people take for granted.

It was maybe one of the most interesting conversations I’ve ever had in my life, and I’m incredibly grateful that he took the time to talk to us about a piece of history that we don’t hear a lot about in Australia. I’m also very grateful to be in Chile at a time when there’s so much political action taking place, and I’m very sad that this isn’t getting a lot of attention from the Anglosphere media. I think people assume that all of Chile’s problems ended when Pinochet left power, but it’s very much not the case.

I hope that when I am Eddy’s age, I am still passionate about equality for all people, regardless of nationality or gender or sexual orientation etc. He is an amazing man, and he also makes the best coffee we’ve had in Santiago so far.

Thank you, Eddy.

Love Julia.

(via newworldgrandtour)

Thanks so much for this Julia!  It is really interesting to read and also quite sad.  Really do wish the Western media would talk about this more.

(via stinkysister)
brujacore
notangryenough:

Chilean student leader Camila Vallejo sits among a peace sign created from empty teargas canisters used by police against protesters. Photograph: Roberto Candia/AP
Not since the days of Zapatistas’ Subcomandante Marcos has Latin America been so charmed by a rebel leader. This time, there is no ski mask, no pipe and no gun, just a silver nose ring.
Meet Commander Camila, a student leader in Chile who has become the face of a populist uprising that some analysts are calling the Chilean winter. Her press conferences can lead to the sacking of a minister. The street marches she leads shut down sections of the Chilean capital. She has the government on the run, and now even has police protection after receiving death threats.
Wednesday saw the start of a two-day nationwide shutdown, as transport workers and other public-sector employees joined the burgeoning student movement in protest.
“There are huge levels of discontent,” said Vallejo in a recent interview. “It is always the youth that make the first move … we don’t have family commitments, this allows us to be freer. We took the first step, but we are no longer alone, the older generations are now joining this fight.”
“We do not want to improve the actual system; we want a profound change – to stop seeing education as a consumer good, to see education as a right where the state provides a guarantee.
“Why do we need education? To make profits. To make a business? Or to develop the country and have social integration and development? Those are the issues in dispute.”
Excerpts from the article on The Guardian Website.

notangryenough:

Chilean student leader Camila Vallejo sits among a peace sign created from empty teargas canisters used by police against protesters. Photograph: Roberto Candia/AP

Not since the days of Zapatistas’ Subcomandante Marcos has Latin America been so charmed by a rebel leader. This time, there is no ski mask, no pipe and no gun, just a silver nose ring.

Meet Commander Camila, a student leader in Chile who has become the face of a populist uprising that some analysts are calling the Chilean winter. Her press conferences can lead to the sacking of a minister. The street marches she leads shut down sections of the Chilean capital. She has the government on the run, and now even has police protection after receiving death threats.

Wednesday saw the start of a two-day nationwide shutdown, as transport workers and other public-sector employees joined the burgeoning student movement in protest.

“There are huge levels of discontent,” said Vallejo in a recent interview. “It is always the youth that make the first move … we don’t have family commitments, this allows us to be freer. We took the first step, but we are no longer alone, the older generations are now joining this fight.”

“We do not want to improve the actual system; we want a profound change – to stop seeing education as a consumer good, to see education as a right where the state provides a guarantee.

“Why do we need education? To make profits. To make a business? Or to develop the country and have social integration and development? Those are the issues in dispute.”

Excerpts from the article on The Guardian Website.

theres-a-cello-in-your-house-now

stay-human:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism: Santiago, Aug 23 (Prensa Latina) - Almost 50 young students have been on hunger strike for 36 days, demanding free and public education; the health of three of them is seriously deteriorating. The spokesman of the protesters, Matias Villegas, declared Tuesday to Radio Cooperativa that the students are demanding that the Executive solve the problem as soon as possible.

Felipe Sanhueza, Matías Ortega and Gloria Negrete are the ones with the worst health conditions, especially Gloria who remains in the San Luis de Buin hospital, just outside Santiago.

Angel Muños (18) and Fidel Carrasco (16) chained themselves in front of a high school in solidarity with the students of Buin and also joined the hunger strike on Monday.

According to the spokeswoman for the Chilean Students Federation, Camila Vallejo, the government is responsible for these extreme measures, like the hunger strike, since it has not changed its position.

Vallejo warned that the strikers’ lives are in danger, and criticized the Chilean government for remaining indifferent towards this crisis.

Meanwhile, social groups keep joining the 48 hours national strike called by the Workers United Center of Chile starting Wednesday.

Social protests have been taking place in Chile since last April when students took the streets, schools and universities demanding the end of education for profit, established by the military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet (1973-1990).